Broward Health Imperial Point
More about GERD

More about GERD

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Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Carbonate Chewable tablet

What is this medicine?

ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE; MAGNESIUM CARBONATE (a LOO mi num hye DROX ide; mag NEE zee um KAR bon ate) is an antacid. It is used to relieve the symptoms of indigestion, heartburn, or gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD).

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bowel, intestinal, or stomach disease

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • on a sodium (salt) restricted diet

  • stomach bleeding or obstruction

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aluminum hydroxide, magnesium carbonate or other antacids, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the label. Chew the tablets well so that foam forms in your mouth before swallowing. Do not suck on or crush the tablets. The protective foam will not form if you do this. After taking this medicine, drink a full glass of water. Antacids are usually taken after meals and at bedtime, or as directed by your doctor or health care professional. You should remain in an upright position for 1 to 2 hours after taking this medicine. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this medicine may be used in children for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • antibiotics

  • delavirdine

  • gabapentin

  • isoniazid

  • medicines for fungal infections like itraconazole and ketoconazole

  • medicines for osteoporosis like alendronate, etidronate, risedronate and tiludronate

  • medicines for seizures like ethotoin and phenytoin

  • methenamine

  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

  • quinidine

  • rosuvastatin

  • sotalol

  • tacrolimus

  • thyroid hormones like levothyroxine

  • vitamin D

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. Do not treat yourself for stomach problems with this medicine for more than 2 weeks. See a doctor if you have black tarry stools, rectal bleeding, or if you feel unusually tired. Do not change to another antacid product without advice.

If you are taking other medicines, leave an interval of at least 2 hours before or after taking this medicine.

To help reduce constipation, drink several glasses of water a day.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • bone or joint aches and pains

  • confusion or irritability

  • headache

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea, vomiting

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • chalky taste

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • hemorrhoids

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light and moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Carbonate Oral suspension

What is this medicine?

ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE; MAGNESIUM CARBONATE (a LOO mi num hye DROX ide; mag NEE zee um KAR bon ate) is an antacid. It is used to relieve the symptoms of indigestion, heartburn, or gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD).

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bowel, intestinal, or stomach disease

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • on a sodium (salt) restricted diet

  • stomach bleeding or obstruction

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aluminum hydroxide, magnesium carbonate or other antacids, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the label. Shake well before using. Use a specially marked spoon or container to measure your medicine. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. Antacids are usually taken after meals and at bedtime, or as directed by your doctor or health care professional. After taking the medication, drink a full glass of water. You should remain in an upright position for 1 to 2 hours after taking this medicine. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this medicine may be used in children for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • antibiotics

  • delavirdine

  • gabapentin

  • isoniazid

  • medicines for fungal infections like itraconazole and ketoconazole

  • medicines for osteoporosis like alendronate, etidronate, risedronate and tiludronate

  • medicines for seizures like ethotoin and phenytoin

  • methenamine

  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

  • quinidine

  • rosuvastatin

  • sotalol

  • tacrolimus

  • thyroid hormones like levothyroxine

  • vitamin D

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. Do not treat yourself for stomach problems with this medicine for more than 2 weeks. See a doctor if you have black tarry stools, rectal bleeding, or if you feel unusually tired. Do not change to another antacid product without advice.

If you are taking other medicines, leave an interval of at least 2 hours before or after taking this medicine.

To help reduce constipation, drink several glasses of water a day.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • bone or joint aches and pains

  • confusion or irritability

  • headache

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea, vomiting

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • chalky taste

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • hemorrhoids

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light and moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.



What is GERD?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder that is caused by gastric acid flowing from the stomach into the esophagus.

Gastroesophageal refers to the stomach and esophagus, and reflux means to flow back or return. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the return of acidic stomach juices, or food and fluids, back up into the esophagus. Learn more

Voice Problems from Acid Reflux

Acid reflux can cause problems with voice as the backflow of acid and stomach contents can travel all the way up to your throat. The most frequent symptoms associated with this are:

  • Hoarseness or other voice changes including laryngitis  
  • frequent throat clearing
  • chronic sore throat or pain when speaking
  • chronic dry cough
  • excessive mucous production
  • globus (a feeling of a “lump” in the throat)

These acid reflux symptoms are due to inflammation from the acid and stomach contents. Understandably the irritation and inflammation to the throat or vocal cords can affect the ability of the voice to function normally.

If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis or for more than two weeks at a time you should seek a referral to an ENT (Ear, nose and throat doctor otherwise known as an Otolaryngologist). It is extremely important to have a direct visualization of the throat as any of these symptoms could be due to some very serious other conditions such as cancer. This “laryngoscopy” examination is done by an ENT in the office. A small, flexible scope with a camera is passed through the nose which allows for a view of the throat (pharynx) and voice box (larynx). This only takes a couple of minutes and a nasal decongestant and a topical anesthetic in provided to make it more comfortable. Once examined the physician may prescribe medications, dietary and lifestyle changes to eliminate the damage that can be caused by acid reflux. In many cases you may be referred to a speech language pathologist for voice therapy as voice problems can also be due to misuse of the voice or other conditions that require therapeutic intervention. The Speech Pathology Department at Imperial Point Medical Center specializes in the treatment of voice and swallowing problems.

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Swallowing Problems from Acid Reflux

Acid reflux can cause problems with swallowing as the backflow of acid and stomach contents can cause damage to any of the structures used to swallow from mouth to stomach. The most frequent symptoms associated with this are:

  • frequent throat clearing or coughing during or after meals
  • excessive mucous production especially while eating
  • globus (a feeling of a “lump” in the throat) especially when swallowing
  • food getting “stuck”
  • excessive use of liquids to wash everything down
  • odynophagia (painful swallowing)

These acid reflux symptoms are due to inflammation from the acid and stomach contents. Understandably the irritation and inflammation to the throat or esophagus can affect the ability to swallow normally.

If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis or for more than two weeks at a time you should speak with your physician. This is very important as any of these symptoms could be due to some very serious other conditions such as cancer or aspiration (food or liquid entering the lungs). There are two examinations that ideally should be recommended. Both exams are done under x-ray. One test will examine the movement of food and liquid from mouth to esophagus. This test is a video swallow function otherwise known as a modified barium swallow. A speech language pathologist will conduct this exam. The second test will examine the movement of liquid through the esophagus into the stomach. This test is an esophagram otherwise known as a regular barium swallow. A radiologist or radiology tech will conduct this exam. Once the cause of the problem with swallowing has been identified you may be referred to either a speech language pathologist for treatment, a gastroenterologist for further evaluation or simply be placed on medication with dietary and lifestyle changes recommended. The Speech Pathology Department at Broward Health Imperial Point specializes in the treatment of voice and swallowing problems.

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