Diabetes Program

Diabetes Program

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Acetohexamide tablets

What are acetohexamide tablets?

ACETOHEXAMIDE helps to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Treatment is combined with a suitable diet and balanced exercise. Acetohexamide increases the amount of insulin released from the pancreas and helps your body to use insulin more efficiently. Generic acetohexamide tablets are available.

NOTE: This drug is discontinued in the United States.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • major surgery

  • porphyria

  • severe infection or injury

  • thyroid disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to acetohexamide, sulfonamides, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I take this medicine?

Take acetohexamide tablets by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets with a drink of water. If you take acetohexamide once a day, take it 30 minutes before breakfast. If you take it twice a day, it is best to take it before breakfast and the evening meal. If acetohexamide upsets your stomach take it with food or milk. Take your doses at the same time each day; do not take more often than directed.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Elderly patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What drug(s) may interact with acetohexamide?

  • alcohol

  • beta-blockers (used for high blood pressure or heart conditions)

  • cisapride

  • clofibrate

  • diazoxide

  • medicines for fungal or yeast infections (examples: itraconazole, ketonazole, voriconazole)

  • metoclopramide

  • rifampin

  • warfarin (a blood thinner)

Many medications may cause changes (increase or decrease) in blood sugar, these include:

  • alcohol containing beverages

  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs

  • beta-blockers, often used for high blood pressure or heart problems (examples include atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol)

  • chromium

  • female hormones, such as estrogens or progestins, birth control pills

  • isoniazid

  • male hormones or anabolic steroids

  • medications for weight loss

  • medicines for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough

  • niacin

  • pentamidine

  • phenytoin

  • quinolone antibiotics (examples: ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin)

  • some herbal dietary supplements

  • steroid medicines such as prednisone or cortisone

  • thyroid hormones

  • water pills (diuretics)

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What should I watch for while taking acetohexamide?

Visit your prescriber or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Learn how to monitor blood or urine sugar and urine ketones regularly. Check with your prescriber or health care professional if your blood sugar is high, you may need a change of dose of acetohexamide. Do not skip meals. If you are exercising much more than usual you may need extra snacks to avoid side effects caused by low blood sugar. Alcohol can increase possible side effects of acetohexamide. Ask your prescriber or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. If you have mild symptoms of low blood sugar, eat or drink something containing sugar at once and contact your prescriber or health care professional. It is wise to check your blood sugar to confirm that it is low. It is important to recognize your own symptoms of low blood sugar so that you can treat them quickly. Make sure family members know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you have serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once.

Acetohexamide can increase the sensitivity of your skin to the sun. Keep out of the sun, or wear protective clothing outdoors and use a sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or sun tanning beds or booths.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your prescriber or health care professional that you are taking acetohexamide.

Wear a medical identification bracelet or chain to say you have diabetes, and carry a card that lists all your medications.

What side effects may I notice from taking acetohexamide?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) which can cause symptoms such as anxiety or nervousness, confusion, difficulty concentrating, hunger, pale skin, nausea, fatigue, perspiration, headache, palpitations, numbness of the mouth, tingling in the fingers, tremors, muscle weakness, blurred vision, cold sensations, uncontrolled yawning, irritability, rapid heartbeat, shallow breathing, and loss of consciousness.

  • breathing difficulties, severe skin reactions or excessive phlegm, which may indicate that you are having an allergic reaction to the drug.

  • dark yellow or brown urine, or yellowing of the eyes or skin, indicating that the drug is affecting your liver.

  • fever, chills, sore throat; which means the drug may be affecting your immune system.

  • unusual bleeding or bruising; which occurs when the drug is affecting your blood clotting system.

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • headache

  • heartburn

  • increased sensitivity to the sun

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach discomfort

  • skin rash, redness, swelling or itching

Where can I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Knowledge is Power.

The Diabetes Education Program at Broward Health Medical Center can teach you how to live a healthier and more productive life!

Currently, nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Seventy-nine million Americans have prediabetes – elevated blood sugar that increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Researchers predict that by the year 2050, the number of Americans with diabetes will increase to one in three. Diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

In order to determine whether or not you have pre-diabetes or diabetes, your physician conducts a Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) Test or an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). Either test can be used to diagnose pre-diabetes or diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends the FPG because it is easier, faster and less expensive to perform.

With the FPG test, a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl signals pre-diabetes. A person with a fasting blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or higher has diabetes.

In the OGTT, a person's blood glucose level is measured after a fast and two hours after drinking a glucose-rich beverage. If the two-hour blood glucose level is between 140 and 199 mg/dl, the person tested has pre-diabetes. If the two-hour blood glucose level is at 200 mg/dl or higher, the person tested has diabetes.

ABCs of Diabetes

Our personalized diabetes program targets the ABCs of diabetes

  • A: is for A(1)C- a blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels during the last three months. Goal: less than 7%.
  • B: is for blood pressure. Goal: 140/80
  • C: is for cholesterol - elevated blood sugar levels increase cholesterol and makes it easier for cholesterol to stick to blood vessels and clog arteries. Goal: For most people, here are the total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides numbers to aim for:
    • Total cholesterol: Less than 200mg/dl
    • LDL cholesterol: Less than 100mg/dl
    • HDL cholesterol: Higher than 40mg/dl for men and 50mg/dl for women is good, but an HDL of 50mg/dl or higher helps everyone lower their risk for heart disease.
    • Triglycerides: Less than 150mg/dl

Education

Our educational classes are for individuals with Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes. We offer one-on-one sessions with a certified diabetes educator and/or dietician as well as group sessions involving our entire staff.

Getting Started

The Diabetes Education Program is located on the 8th floor of the Physician Office Building of Broward Health Medical Center. A physician, professional staff or self-referrals are welcome. Click here for our referral prescription form.

For more information on any of our programs, support groups and services, please call us at 954-355-5363.

If you do not have a physician and would like a physician referral, please call the Broward Health Line at 954-759-7400. Most insurance companies reimburse and encourage education for their clients with diabetes. Any questions regarding coverage should be referred to your insurance provider.

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