Stroke Center

Stroke Center

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Aspirin, Dipyridamole Oral capsule, extended-release

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN; DIPYRIDAMOLE (AS pir in; dye peer ID a mole) is used to decrease the risk of stroke in patients who have had a stroke or transient ischemic attack. A transient ischemic attack is also known as a TIA or mini-stroke.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • asthma

  • bleeding or clotting problems

  • drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages a day

  • kidney or liver disease

  • nasal polyps

  • stomach ulcers, or other stomach problems

  • vitamin K deficiency

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, dipyridamole, salicylates, NSAIDs, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the label. The capsules must be swallowed whole. Do not crush or chew. You can take this medicine with or without food. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin or heparin

  • methotrexate

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • acetazolamide

  • adenosine

  • antiinflammatory drugs, NSAIDs like ibuprofen

  • aspirin-containing medicines or other salicylates

  • diuretics

  • medicines for Alzheimer's disease or myasthenia gravis

  • medicines for diabetes that are taken by mouth

  • medicines for high blood pressure like ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers

  • medicines for seizures like phenytoin or valproic acid

  • probenecid

  • sulfinpyrazone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not take other aspirin products unless directed by your doctor or health care professional. Many non-prescription medicines contain aspirin. To prevent accidental overdose, read labels carefully and do not take more than one product that contains aspirin.

If you have diabetes, this medicine may affect your blood sugar levels. Check with your doctor or health care professional before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Aspirin can irritate your stomach. Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes can make this irritation worse and may cause ulcers or bleeding problems. Ask your doctor or health care professional for help to stop smoking or drinking. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are receiving cancer chemotherapy or medicine for your immune system, do not take this medicine without checking with your doctor or health care professional. Aspirin may hide the signs of an infection like fever or pain and increase your risk of bleeding.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • ringing in the ears

  • seizure

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • signs and symptoms of a blood clot such as breathing problems; changes in vision; chest pain; severe, sudden headache; pain, swelling, warmth in the leg; trouble speaking; sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • flushing, reddening of the skin

  • headache

  • nausea

  • reduced amount of urine passed

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from excessive heat and moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


What Is a Stroke or Brain Attack?

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of adult disability.

A stroke is similar to a heart attack. In a heart attack the blood flow is interrupted in the heart and it doesn't get enough oxygen. A brain attack is similar but blood flow to the brain is interrupted, the brain does not get enough oxygen and brain cells quickly begin to die.

Gold SealRecognized as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission's Certificate of Distinction, the Broward Health Medical Center Certified Stroke Center has a comprehensive system in place for providing rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke to patients who are admitted to the Emergency Department.

Common Questions Regarding a Stroke

What are the benefits of a Stroke Center?

  • Reduced morbidity and mortality
  • Advanced use of acute stroke therapies
  • Fewer stroke complications
  • Improved long-term outcomes
  • Improved efficiency of patient care
  • Increased patient satisfaction

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Another way to remember stroke symptoms:

  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body or sudden weakness/numbness of face, arm, or leg
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking or loss of balance
  • Sudden severe headache

Call 9-1-1 at any sign of stroke

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Controllable Risk Factors

Many of the things that increase your stroke risk can be controlled. The diseases that increase risk can be treated. Lifestyle choices such as eating and exercise habits can be changed.

Treatable Diseases That Increase Stroke Risk:

  • High Blood Pressure (hypertension)
  • Atrial Fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)
  • High Cholesterol
  • Diabetes

Lifestyle Choices That Increase Stroke Risk:

  • Tobacco Use/Smoking
  • Alcohol Use
  • Obesity/Excessive Weight

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Uncontrollable Risk Factors

Some risk factors are controllable while others are not. The following are things you can't control but need to be aware of since they increase your risk for stroke.

  • Age. A stroke can happen to anyone, but your risk of stroke increases with age. After the age of 55, your stroke risk doubles for every decade.
  • Gender. Stroke is more common in men than women. But more women than men die from stroke.
  • Race. If you are African American, your risk is twice the rate for whites. If you are Hispanic or Asian/Pacific Islander, your stroke risk is also higher than Caucasions.
  • Family History. If someone in your family has had a stroke, you have a higher risk of stroke yourself.
  • Previous Stroke or TIA. If you have already had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), you have a 25-40 percent chance of having another stroke in the next five years.

Having one or more of these risk factors does not mean you will automatically have a stroke. But because your stroke risk is higher, ask your doctor about changes you can make to prevent a stroke.

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Act F.A.S.T. — You Can Prevent a Stroke!

Remember, 80 percent of strokes are preventable. Which means every year, up to 600,000 Americans could have prevented their strokes.

In the hospital, dial "22" for "Brain Attack." Outside the hospital, dial "911."

CT Scans are used to determine eligibility for "clot buster" medication. Patients only have a 4.5-HOUR window. TIME IS IMPORTANT. Act fast for strokes.

For more information about our services or a free physician referral, call the Broward Health Line at 954-759-7400.

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