Broward Health Imperial Point

More retinal procedures are performed at Broward Health Imperial Point than any other hospital in Broward County.

Imperial Point Surgery Center

Imperial Point Surgery Center

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Allopurinol Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

ALLOPURINOL (al oh PURE i nole) reduces the amount of uric acid the body makes. It is used to treat the symptoms of gout. It is also used to treat or prevent high uric acid levels that occur as a result of certain types of chemotherapy. This medicine may also help patients who frequently have kidney stones.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • kidney or liver disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to allopurinol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. If this medicine upsets your stomach, take it with food or milk. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 6 years for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with the following medication:

  • didanosine, ddI

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amoxicillin or ampicillin

  • azathioprine

  • certain medicines used to treat gout

  • certain types of diuretics

  • chlorpropamide

  • cyclosporine

  • dicumarol

  • mercaptopurine

  • tolbutamide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. If you are taking this medicine to treat gout, you may not have less frequent attacks at first. Keep taking your medicine regularly and the attacks should get better within 2 to 6 weeks. Drink plenty of water (10 to 12 full glasses a day) while you are taking this medicine. This will help to reduce stomach upset and reduce the risk of getting gout or kidney stones.

Call your doctor or health care professional at once if you get a skin rash together with chills, fever, sore throat, or nausea and vomiting, if you have blood in your urine, or difficulty passing urine.

Do not take vitamin C without asking your doctor or health care professional. Too much vitamin C can increase the chance of getting kidney stones.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Alcohol can also increase the chance of stomach problems and increase the amount of uric acid in your blood. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • muscle aches or pains

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • changes in taste

  • diarrhea

  • indigestion

  • stomach pain or cramps

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 25 degrees C (59 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light and moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Allopurinol Sodium Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

ALLOPURINOL (al oh PURE i nole) reduces the amount of uric acid the body makes during chemotherapy. Too much uric acid in the blood can cause damage to your kidneys.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to allopurinol, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast feeding

How should I use this medicine?

The medicine is for infusion into a vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with the following medication:

  • didanosine, ddI

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amoxicillin or ampicillin

  • azathioprine

  • certain medicines used to treat gout

  • chlorpropamide

  • cyclosporine

  • diuretics

  • mercaptopurine

  • probenecid

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medicine.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells.

Drink plenty of water while you are taking this medicine. This will help to reduce the risk of getting gout or kidney stones.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • difficulty passing urine

  • loss of appetite

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusually weak or tired

  • vomiting

  • yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • drowsiness

  • nausea

  • stomach pain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.




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Imperial Point Surgery Center, located at the Medical Arts Pavilion, is a state-of-the-art outpatient surgery center where patients receive top-quality, compassionate care by our staff of specialized doctors, nurses and healthcare providers.

Board certified ophthalmologists at the center include corneal, retinal, glaucoma and cataract specialists.

The eye suites are fully outfitted with state-of-the-art ophthalmology equipment, including the latest in specialized cataract machines, microscopes and lasers.

For further information, call 954-928-3250, Monday through Friday, 8 am - 4 pm.

Eye Conditions and Surgeries

The following is a list of eye conditions treated and surgeries performed, but not limited to, at the Surgery Center:

Macular Hole: a tiny hole, located at the center of the retina, responsible for sharp, reading vision. A surgical procedure called a “vitrectomy with membrane peel” is used to treat macular holes.

Sutureless Vitrectomy Surgery: used for retinal procedures like macular holes, in which small tubes or cannulas are placed through the eye and tiny instruments are placed through these tubes. Once the surgery is completed, the tubes are removed and no stitches are needed. This sutureless technique cannot be used for all retinal surgery.

Retinal Detachment and Re-attachment: Retinal detachment is the breaking away of the retina from the outer wall of the eye. It is often associated with flashes of light and sudden floaters – little dark spots that float across the eye. To re-attach the retina to the inner surface of the eye, a band of silicone is sewn to the outside of the eye. This band pushes against the hole to close it, making a scar that will hold the retina in place. Sometimes in retinal detachment, there is pigment on the retina, and the vitreous may have to be removed by a vitrectomy.

Macular Degeneration: degenerative damage to the small area at the back of the retina, called the macula, that allows us to see fine details clearly. In Wet Macular Degeneration, there is growth of abnormal blood vessels in the retina, which tend to leak. Degeneration can be slowed through laser treatments and pharmaceuticals.

Cataract Surgery with Lens Implants: during surgery for cataract removal, in which the eye’s natural lens has become cloudy, the latest intraocular lenses can be implanted. Some of these lenses may eliminate the need for glasses. Ask your ophthalmologist about your options.

Corneal Transplant: the replacement of the clear window on the front of the eye with a donor cornea. This outpatient surgery is usually done under anesthesia.

Pterygium: a fleshy growth that invades the cornea. If the pterygium is large enough to threaten sight, is growing or is unsightly, it can be removed surgically.

For further information, call 954-928-3250, Monday through Friday, 8 am - 4 pm.

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New Treatment for Kidney Stones

The Surgery Center at Broward Health Imperial Point is now offering Extracorporal Shock Wave Lithotripsy to treat kidney stones. Lithotripsy is a noninvasive procedure used to treat kidney stones that are too large to pass through the urinary tract. When kidney stones become too large to pass through the urinary tract, they may cause severe pain, may block the flow of urine, and can cause infection.

Lithotripsy treats kidney stones by sending focused ultrasonic energy or shock waves directly to the stone, breaking it into smaller stones that will pass through the urinary system. Lithotripsy allows persons with certain types of stones in the urinary system to avoid an invasive surgical procedure for stone removal.

Our advanced technology ensures precise alignment at all times and makes it easier to target the stone. The advanced ultrasound technology allows real-time, continuous monitoring of the disintegration process to ensure precise stone targeting, which maximizes shockwave delivery and minimizes radiation dosage.

For further information, call 954-928-3250, Monday through Friday, 8 am - 4 pm.

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