Colorectal Center

Colorectal Center

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Cetuximab Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

CETUXIMAB (se TUX i mab) is a chemotherapy drug. It targets a specific protein within cancer cells and stops the cells from growing. It is used to treat colorectal cancer and head and neck cancer.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • heart disease

  • history of irregular heartbeat

  • history of low levels of calcium, magnesium, or potassium in the blood

  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to cetuximab, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This drug is given as an infusion into a vein. It is administered in a hospital or clinic by a specially trained health care professional.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss your dose. Call your doctor or health care professional if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. This drug may make you feel generally unwell. This is not uncommon, as chemotherapy can affect healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Report any side effects. Continue your course of treatment even though you feel ill unless your doctor tells you to stop.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun while taking this medicine and for 2 months after the last dose. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

You may need blood work done while you are taking this medicine.

In some cases, you may be given additional medicines to help with side effects. Follow all directions for their use.

Call your doctor or health care professional for advice if you get a fever, chills or sore throat, or other symptoms of a cold or flu. Do not treat yourself. This drug decreases your body's ability to fight infections. Try to avoid being around people who are sick.

Avoid taking products that contain aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen unless instructed by your doctor. These medicines may hide a fever.

Do not become pregnant while taking this medicine. Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Use adequate birth control methods. Avoid pregnancy for at least 6 months after your last dose. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information. Do not breast-feed an infant while taking this medicine or during the 2 months after your last dose.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in vision

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • fever, chills

  • mouth sores

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • changes in skin like acne, cracks, skin dryness

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • headache

  • nail changes

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach upset

  • weight loss

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.



Are you suffering in silence?

Young caucasian couple hugging

As many as 1 in 13 adults have problems with bowel control and about half of the population has hemorrhoids by age 50. These problems are rarely discussed and may have a dramatic impact on quality of life. Many people incorrectly assume they are a normal consequence of aging or are normal problems for women after childbirth.

The Colorectal Center at Broward Health Coral Springs is your local resource for colorectal solutions. We are committed to excellence and to providing cutting edge, innovative and improved surgical techniques in order to maximize patient results.

What disease specialties are included in a Colorectal Center?
Our comprehensive program includes physicians and a WOCN (Wound, Ostomy, Continence) advanced registered nurse practitioner specializing in the following:

What makes up your Colorectal Center?
Our colon and rectal specialists are fully trained surgeons with board certification in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of benign and malignant colon and rectal conditions. We are focused on helping you achieve comfort through accurate diagnosis, specialized treatment and follow-up care. Emphasis is placed on the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer via screening and surveillance programs. Special attention is given to the family history to assess for a possible genetic-familial component to colorectal cancer and polyps including genetic counseling and testing. Minimally invasive laparoscopic colon resections are also available for both benign conditions such as diverticulitis and Crohn's disease as well as for cancer in order to minimize postoperative pain and allow earlier return to work and daily activities. The colorectal program also has specialized ultrasound capability to accurately diagnose rectal cancer and polyps.

Specialty treatments include:

PROCEDURE FOR PROLAPSE HEMORRHOIDS (PPH)
Individuals suffering from hemorrhoids now have access to a minimally invasive procedure called Procedure for Prolapsed Hemorrhoids (PPH). Typically, there is much less pain from hemorrhoid surgery with this approach.

What does the procedure involve?
This procedure involves lifting the hemorrhoidal tissue and placing it back where it belongs – in the original anatomical position. The blood flow to the internal and external hemorrhoids reduces, causing the hemorrhoids to shrink within four to six weeks after the procedure. This same-day surgical procedure is usually performed in 25 to 30 minutes. Patients are under IV sedation and receive local anesthesia for the surgery site. They go home an hour or two following the procedure, experience some discomfort for a few days, and usually can return to work within a week.

How is the PPH Procedure different from other methods of treating hemorrhoids?
Until recently, there were only two major methods of hemorrhoid removal. The surgeon would either remove the affected tissue with a scalpel during a hemorrhoidectomy or tighten tiny rubber bands around the affected area to cut off its blood supply.

Who is a candidate?
Before considering surgery, patients are treated with different medications and a high fiber diet and told not to strain. Physicians grade hemorrhoids on a scale of one to four, with four being the worst. Usually grade one and grade two can be treated with medications, but when a patient reaches grade three and grade four, most of the time surgery is recommended.

OSTOMY PROGRAM
The terms ostomy and stoma are general descriptive terms that are often used to describe a surgically created opening in the body for the discharge of body wastes. Successful planning and management of ostomy surgery provides patients the opportunity to lead full, normal, and productive lives. Approximately 750,000 Americans are living with an ostomy and an estimated 75,000 new surgeries are performed each year.

At Broward Health Coral Springs, a board certified wound ostomy continence nurse practitioner and two board certified colon and rectal surgeons are available for consultation as needed. Learn more about the Ostomy Program »

For more information, or a free physician referral, call the Broward Health Line at 954-759-7400.

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