Broward Health Imperial Point
Dysphagia Therapy

Dysphagia Therapy

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Aluminum Hydroxide Oral suspension

What is this medicine?

ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE (a LOO mi num hye DROX ide)is an antacid. It is used to relieve the symptoms of indigestion, heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), or stomach ulcers. It is also used to treat high phosphate levels in patients with kidney disease.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • constipation

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • on a sodium (salt) restricted diet

  • stomach bleeding or obstruction

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aluminum hydroxide or other antacids, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the label. Shake well before using. Use a specially marked spoon or container to measure your medicine. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. Antacids are usually taken after meals and at bedtime, or as directed by your doctor or health care professional. After taking the medication, drink a full glass of water. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this medicine may be used in children for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • antibiotics like tetracycline

  • delavirdine

  • gabapentin

  • heart medicines, such as digoxin or digitoxin

  • isoniazid

  • medicines for fungal infections like itraconazole, ketoconazole

  • medicines for osteoporosis like alendronate, etidronate, risedronate, tiludronate

  • medicines for seizures like ethotoin, phenytoin

  • methenamine

  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

  • quinidine

  • rosuvastatin

  • sotalol

  • tacrolimus

  • thyroid hormones like levothyroxine

  • vitamin D

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. Do not treat yourself for stomach problems with this medicine for more than one week. See a doctor if you have black tarry stools, rectal bleeding, or if you feel unusually tired. Do not change to another antacid product without advice.

If you are taking other medicines, leave an interval of at least 2 hours before or after taking this medicine.

To help reduce constipation, drink several glasses of water a day.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • bone or joint aches and pains

  • confusion or irritability

  • headache

  • loss of appetite

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation

  • hemorrhoids

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light and moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


A Comprehensive Approach to Improving Swallowing and Quality of Life

Click here to watch short videos about dysphagia and the swallow study performed at Broward Health Imperial Point. 

What is Dysphagia?

Dysphagia is the term used to describe "difficulty swallowing." We take eating and drinking for granted until we or someone we know has difficulty. Eating and drinking are uniquely tied to socialization with others and often are combined with a deep cultural and symbolic association. The inability to swallow normally can have a devastating impact on quality of life.

How many people have Dysphagia?

One out of 17 people have difficulty swallowing with an estimated 10 million Americans suffering from this disorder.

Two-thirds of oral and throat cancer survivors will also have dysphagia. If dysphagia is not treated it can lead to some very serious healthcare consequences.

The good news is that with highly specialized and targeted therapeutic interventions this does not have to be a permanent condition.

The Dysphagia Program at Broward Health Imperial Point

Our program is uniquely designed to incorporate state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment with integrative healing. Our holistic approach combines the best of western and eastern medicine through an interdisciplinary team dedicated to restoring swallow function.

Treatments include, but are not limited to, electrical stimulation, myofascial release, soft tissue manipulation, manual therapy, electrotherapeutic point stimulation, range of motion and stretching exercises.

We are constantly expanding our therapeutic options to include additional techniques such as acupuncture, auricular therapy and craniosacral therapy.

If you or someone you know has dysphagia, contact your physician and ask for a video swallow function test. This diagnostic test utilizes a moving x-ray to view inside your throat while you are eating and drinking. This exam only takes a few minutes and allows us to determine the exact cause of your problem with swallowing. This test will also establish if you are a candidate for our dysphagia program.

For more information, contact:
Teresa Biber, M.S. CCC-SLP
Rehabilitation Services
Broward Health Imperial Point
6401 N. Federal Highway
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308
954-776-8830
tbiber@browardhealth.org

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Program Coordinator

Teresa Biber, M.S.CCC-SLP, has been working with swallowing disorders as well as the head and neck cancer population since 1996. She is known nationally as an innovator in dysphagia treatment. Ms. Biber developed a unique protocol that uses electrical stimulation to restore swallow function. Her success with patients who have completed radiation therapy for head and neck cancer has been enhanced by incorporating specific manipulation techniques and therapeutic exercise regimes commonly utilized by Physical Therapy.
 
"The physical therapists here have enlightened me to a whole new way of looking at my patients. I come to work excited every day, thinking about all the resources I have to effectively treat this debilitating disorder. It is my firm belief that without the unique combination of speech pathology and skilled physical therapy, in an integrated holistic approach, our patients could never achieve such overwhelmingly positive outcomes."

Ms. Biber is a member of the Dysphagia Research Society as well as many other professional societies. She currently serves as a consultant on a large, multi-center, randomized clinical trial funded by the National Cancer Institute that is specially designed to investigate her protocol with the head and neck cancer population.

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