Stroke Center

Stroke Center

What Is a Stroke or Brain Attack?

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of adult disability.

A stroke is similar to a heart attack. In a heart attack the blood flow is interrupted in the heart and it doesn't get enough oxygen. A brain attack is similar but blood flow to the brain is interrupted, the brain does not get enough oxygen and brain cells quickly begin to die.

Gold SealRecognized as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission's Certificate of Distinction, the Broward Health Medical Center Certified Stroke Center has a comprehensive system in place for providing rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke to patients who are admitted to the Emergency Department.

Common Questions Regarding a Stroke

What are the benefits of a Stroke Center?

  • Reduced morbidity and mortality
  • Advanced use of acute stroke therapies
  • Fewer stroke complications
  • Improved long-term outcomes
  • Improved efficiency of patient care
  • Increased patient satisfaction

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Another way to remember stroke symptoms:

  • Sudden weakness on one side of the body or sudden weakness/numbness of face, arm, or leg
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking or loss of balance
  • Sudden severe headache

Call 9-1-1 at any sign of stroke

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Controllable Risk Factors

Many of the things that increase your stroke risk can be controlled. The diseases that increase risk can be treated. Lifestyle choices such as eating and exercise habits can be changed.

Treatable Diseases That Increase Stroke Risk:

  • High Blood Pressure (hypertension)
  • Atrial Fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)
  • High Cholesterol
  • Diabetes

Lifestyle Choices That Increase Stroke Risk:

  • Tobacco Use/Smoking
  • Alcohol Use
  • Obesity/Excessive Weight

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Uncontrollable Risk Factors

Some risk factors are controllable while others are not. The following are things you can't control but need to be aware of since they increase your risk for stroke.

  • Age. A stroke can happen to anyone, but your risk of stroke increases with age. After the age of 55, your stroke risk doubles for every decade.
  • Gender. Stroke is more common in men than women. But more women than men die from stroke.
  • Race. If you are African American, your risk is twice the rate for whites. If you are Hispanic or Asian/Pacific Islander, your stroke risk is also higher than Caucasions.
  • Family History. If someone in your family has had a stroke, you have a higher risk of stroke yourself.
  • Previous Stroke or TIA. If you have already had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), you have a 25-40 percent chance of having another stroke in the next five years.

Having one or more of these risk factors does not mean you will automatically have a stroke. But because your stroke risk is higher, ask your doctor about changes you can make to prevent a stroke.

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Act F.A.S.T. — You Can Prevent a Stroke!

Remember, 80 percent of strokes are preventable. Which means every year, up to 600,000 Americans could have prevented their strokes.

In the hospital, dial "22" for "Brain Attack." Outside the hospital, dial "911."

CT Scans are used to determine eligibility for "clot buster" medication. Patients only have a 4.5-HOUR window. TIME IS IMPORTANT. Act fast for strokes.

For more information about our services or a free physician referral, call the Broward Health Line at 954-759-7400.

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Meet Our Doctors

47791

James Cimera

Neurology


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Get with the Guidelines 2012 Gold Plus Award: Stroke

The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association recognize Broward Health Medical Center for achieving 85% or higher adherence to all Get With The Guidelines® Stroke Performance Achievement indicators for consecutive 12 month intervals and 75% or higher compliance with 6 of 10 Get With The Guidelines Stroke Quality Measures to improve quality of patient care and outcomes.

Act F.A.S.T.

Act F.A.S.T.

If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and do this simple test:

FACE Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

ARMS Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

SPEECH Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred? Can he/she repeat the sentence correctly?

TIME If the person shows any of these symptoms, time is important.

Call 911 and get to the hospital fast. Brain cells are dying.